5k Race Training8303332905_ba7daa7642_k

Starting with running a 5K is good for new runners. You’ll get lots of motivation, as well as enjoyment, from participating in a race, and 5K (3.1 miles) is the perfect distance for first-timers. Even if you’re a potato couch, you can be ready for a 5K in a short period of time.

Find something that will push you

Register for a 5K and it will serve as your motivation and keep your training consistent. Now you have a goal for your training, the event is the workout purpose for your training and you’re less likely to miss a session if you have a goal.

Whether this is your first race or you are getting back into shape, running a 5k is a great way to succeed at learning to run and earn a shirt given by the race.

14309978488_184bf79116_kStep by Step

Start from where you are, start from walking or a slow run. You wouldn’t want to suffer, by starting from your current fitness level. Running too much too soon is the number one reason most new runner quit. If you are new to running, begin with little in running with mostly walking. This allows your body, mind and spirit time to adapt to the demands of running and it makes for a very enjoyable running experience. It will also allow you to run a bit farther.

Always begin with a 5 minutes warm-up to prepare your body for the run. Finish with a walking then cool down bringing your body back to the normal state. For the running workout, start with 30 seconds to one minute of running and follow with at least double the time for walking 1-3 minutes, or until you catch your breath. Progress little by little, adding more running to the mix and less walking.

Focus on going farther, not faster. 3 times of running per week and alternate run days with rest or cross-training activities (cycling, swimming, yoga, etc.) to allow your body to adapt and recover run to run. Very soon you will be running 30 minutes at a time easily.

 

Breathingwoman-570883_1920

Running requires a lot more oxygen than staying still. Effective Breathing is key to getting the needed oxygen to the working muscles. Breathe through your mouth and nose to your belly.

Breathing can be like a beat, you can follow your foot strikes, breathing in every 2-4 steps and out 2-4 steps. You will breathe more efficiently and getting more oxygen to the working muscles. E.g. inhale for 2 steps and exhale for the next 2 steps, and repeat. Therefore, you can do in 3s or 4s breathe. If you find that you are gasping for air, slow down. Most likely, you are at a pace that is too challenging and your body is not able to keep up.

Pace Yourself

Learning to pace is perhaps the most challenging aspect of running. The best way to learn how to pace is to practice. Mark a loop in your running area, so that the distance every time you run, it will be the same distance. Then predict what your time will be and head out the door and run or walk it. Keep track of the total time it takes to finish and see how close you are to your predicted time.

If you have improved, go out and celebrate; however, if you are slower, it’s time to keep practicing and fine-tuning your skills. If you feel like getting into running gadget, there are a number of cool speed-distance monitors on the market that will give you your speed and distance instantaneously while you run. A speed distance monitor is a watch that shows you speed, distance, time and even calories on the run. It is a great way to learn your pace and the ultimate running gadget.

Stronger Foundation

Include total-body strength-training exercises 2-3 times per week for 1-3 sets to build strength in your musculature, tendons and joints. Developing strength supports your body as you run mile after mile. It will also improve efficiency and form while decreasing the risk of developing an overuse injury.

Mix up your routine, run one day and strength train or cross-train the next. Variety works a lot more muscle groups and keeps your workouts fresh and motivating. Alternating a run day with a cross-training day also allows your body time to adapt and recover from each run.

egg-1364869_1280Food is Fuel

You are what you eat. Your workouts are fueled by the food you eat every day. Keep a log of what you consume daily and it will give you a better perspective of what goes into your system.

If you are having trouble dropping the weight you wanted or just not feeling strong while running, it could have something to do with how you fuel your body day to day. Eat smaller, more frequent meals well balanced with fruits, veggies, lean protein and even fats too. Skipping meals is the quickest way to gain weight and decrease the performance of your next workout.

Below is an 8 weeks 5K training Plan to help get you to the finish line. You must be able to run at least a mile without stopping before you start the training plan.

Notes for 5K Training Plan:

Mondays and Fridays: These 2 days are your rest day. Rest is critical to your recovery and prevent getting injured, so don’t skip your rest days. You will also get mentally and physically burned out if you run every day with no rest.

Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays: Always warm up before you start a run, run at a comfortable pace for the planned mileage. Also always cool down after you exercise. Each week, you will slowly increase your runs by 10%. If you usually run on roads and you’re not sure how far you run, you can figure out the mileage by using some running gadget. You also could drive your route in your car and measure the mileage using your car odometer.

Wednesdays: Do some cross training exercise (cycling, swimming, elliptical trainer, or other activity) at easy to moderate effort for 30 to 40 minutes. Strength Training is also very beneficial for runners. If you’re feeling very sluggish or sore, have a rest day.

Sundays: Your run should be at an easy, comfortable pace, or you can do a run, walk or cross-train. This is an active recovery day.

**This is just a plan, you don’t need to stick to this exactly if you are busy on some of the day, it is fine to switch around with the rest day, run day, cross training or strength training.

 

5K Training Plan

WEEK 1

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 1 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 1 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 1.5 mile run
Sunday – 20 – 30 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 2

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 1.5 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 1.5 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 1.75 mile run
Sunday – 20 – 30 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 3

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 2 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 1.5 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 2 mile run
Sunday – 20 – 30 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 4

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 2.25 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 1.5 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 2.25 mile run
Sunday – 25 – 35 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 5

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 2.5 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 2 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 2.5 mile run
Sunday – 25 – 35 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 6

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 2.75 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 2 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 2.75 mile run
Sunday – 35 –40 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 7

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 3 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 2 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – 3 mile run
Sunday – 35 –40 min run or Cross Training

WEEK 8

Monday – Rest
Tuesday – 3 mile run
Wednesday –Cross Training / Rest
Thursday – 2 mile run
Friday –Rest
Saturday – Rest
Sunday – 5k race day

If you have any comments or question, do drop me a comment below. Happy training

This Post Has 7 Comments

  1. Oh, my god! I have to say, thank you :):) I run 3-4 times a week and never been able to breathe correctly as I run. However, your strategy makes sense, pacing it with your steps. I am curious do I breathe in through my nose and out with my mouth?

    1. Hi Amber, You are welcome . Yes, you are right, breath in through your nose and out from your mouth. You will find out that you are able to last longer in ur runs as well :-

  2. Wow! Very detailed information! Excited after reading your advice. I haven’t really been running very consistently. I shall follow the routine you have provided. Looking forward to a fit and healthy lifestyle. Thanks for sharing!

  3. Hey man,

    Hey bro nice job in giving a workout routine to follow. I like it that you give some helpful stuff. Other websites about marathon running to not give you an example of a training routine and they just tell you to run. That is not useful at all, but your website is the best man!

    1. Thanks Emmanuel. I will be constantly updating the pages, so more info coming up soon :-

  4. Is there a way to train to for a 5K run in under a month?

    I’m not a runner, but I bought a ticket to participate in a local run in just under a month to help the ones in need.

    The Plan that you propose looks interesting but I was wondering if you can push yourself the double the speed.

    I do not like cardiovascular exercises but now that I’ll be participation in this run I’ll try to completed at least.

    Can you help me out, what recommendations will you give me?

    Thanks

    1. Hi Kevin, actually you can get yourself train up under a month. Just that on the day of the event, you just run at a slower pace, you should be able to finish within the time given. If you want to train yourself double the distance, you can but atleast after the first week, if only the distance seems very easy for you. if you have never run before is best to follow the schedule to prevent injuries. hope this helped. just drop me a question if you have anymore.

      James

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